Friday, 8 January 2016

Have you seen the latest trends for UK breeding waders from the BTO?

If not here they are for a select number of species, they don't make easy reading.


Photo: Elis Simpson
Eurasian Oystercatcher  
Haematopus ostralegus
Threat levels: 
Global - Near Threatened 
European - Vulnerable 
UK - Amber

This graph shows the marked increase in Eurasian Oystercatchers that occurred in the 1970s due to the colonisation of inland waterways. The population then stablised until the early 2000s and now is in decline.



© BTO

Photo: Elis Simpson
Eurasian Golden Plover
Pluvialis apricaria
Threat levels:
Global - Least Concern
European - Least Concern
UK - Green

Moderate decline in the UK in general although the monitoring has only been carried our since 1974 before which there may well have been an earlier decline. There has been a sharp decline in Wales.




© BTO

Photo: Elis Simpson
Northern Lapwing
Vanellus vanellus
Threat levels: 
Global - Near Threatened
European - Vulnerable
UK - Red

This species is still the commonest UK wader, but its decline has been alarming after rising in the 1960s and 70s. It declined very steeply from the mid 1980s. Some regions have seen a decline of up to nearly 90% especially in lowland wet meadows in Wales and the southeast of England.


© BTO

Photo: Elis Simpson
Eurasian Curlew
Numenius arquata
Threat levels:
Global - Near Threatened
European - Vulnerable
UK - Red

Gains in the 1960s and early 70s were reversed in the mid 1970s since when there has been a steady decline. The worst losses are in Wales, Scotland and Northern England. there is also a decline across its range in Europe.



© BTO

Photo: Elis Simpson
Common Sandpiper
Actitis hypoleucos
Threat levels:
Global - Least Concern
European - Least Concern (Near Threatened in EU countires)
UK - Amber

The reasons for the decline of this species is hard to define and may be linked to what is happening to it in Africa in the winter although it is declining across Europe.




© BTO

Photo: Elis Simpson
Common Redshank
Tringa totanus
Threat levels:
Global - Least Concern
European - Least Concern (Vulnerable in EU countires)
UK - Amber

Wetland drainage and saltmarsh grazing seem to be the culprits in the decline of the Common Redshank particularly in the Midlands where over 80% of the birds have been lost, the southwest, over 50% and the north of England over 45%.


© BTO

Photo: Hugh Harrop 
www.shetlandwildlife.co.uk
Eurasian Woodcock
Scolopax rusticola
Threat levels:
Global - Least Concern
European - Least Concern
UK - Red

A number of reasons for the decline of this species have been given such as recreational disturbance, drying of woodland, over grazing by deer, reduction in woodland management and maturing of plantations but no clear theory is quoted. At the same time there is a decline across Europe and here in the UK the numbers shot has never been higher. 
© BTO

Photo: Elis Simpson
Common Snipe
Gallinago gallinago
Threat levels:
Global - Least Concern
European - Least Concern
UK - Amber

Farmland draining caused a decline in the 1970s and although some re-wetting of land has occurred the birds remain collected in certain areas suggesting that there is more to their decline than simply lack of wetlands, perhaps the abundance of prey to be found is insufficient in some wetland areas. Range loss has been reported widely in Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland in addition to lowland England so the range contraction is not restricted to lowland areas.
© BTO

For more details and species visit the BTO BirdTrends website page .


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